Divide and Conquer Your Video Production

Red Fox Media - Video Production - Birmingham, AL -Dual HVX SetupIn our experience as video production professionals, we’ve learned that one of the biggest factors in budgeting for a particular job is time.

  • How much time will be required to conceptualize and script a video project?
  • How much time will we need in-studio or on location?
  • How many shooting days will be required?
  • How much time will we need to put the whole video together and deliver a final product?

Of course there are other factors to consider as well, including the cost of on-camera talent, additional crew, equipment, travel, etc. However, a video’s budget will grow exponentially when a client needs additional days for shooting, post-production, etc. The budget for a five-day shoot will look very different from a budget for a half-day shoot.

Most projects we work on require multiple camera set-ups, which require the movement of camera, lights, people, additional gear, etc. All of those set-ups mean that we can only capture a certain amount of footage per day. However, one way to increase the amount that can be shot in one day is to use a 2nd unit camera.

From a budgeting stand point, it may seem like an unnecessary expense to use two camera packages and two camera operators for one job. However, employing the use of a 2nd camera unit may actually reduce the cost of the video, because you are accomplishing more in less time.

This strategy is the most effective when there is a long, complicated shot list with several different locations and a small window of time. Rather than have one camera unit spend four days shooting everything, why not invest in a second camera unit and get all of your shots completed in two days? The first camera unit can spend time at your main location, conducting interviews with your staff and shooting b-roll of your operation, while the 2nd camera unit shoots b-roll of satellite offices, off site installs, and conducts interviews with clients. And if your video calls for an on-camera panel discussion with two or more individuals, you can use both cameras to cross-shoot the scene and omit the need to reset one camera for multiple angles. It can be a very efficient way to tackle your project.

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One Response to “Divide and Conquer Your Video Production”

  1. Jamison says:

    Good article. I ALWAYS use a second camera, even if the client wants a cheap wedding with one camera. I can make a product that is more fun to produce and the client feels like they got a better deal than they were expecting. It takes zero effort to set up a camera somewhere that is a good “go to” shot when your manned camera has to make a quick pan.

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