Archive for the ‘Discussion’ Category

Public Parc: Determining Your Search Terms

Tuesday, May 4th, 2010

Our free e-newsletter is distributed every first Tuesday of the month. Included in each issue is the “Public Parc,” a forum for discussing different topics pertaining to sales, marketing, video, and social media. Subscribers to the newsletter and readers of the blog are encouraged to get involved in the discussion by posting their comments here. You can also post your thoughts on Twitter, using the hashtag #PublicParc. Here is this month’s Public Parc discussion:

If you were to do a Google search to find a video production company and/or a website design/development company, what search terms would you use?

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Public Parc: Time Spent Watching Video

Tuesday, April 6th, 2010

Our free e-newsletter is distributed every first Tuesday of the month. Included in each issue is the “Public Parc,” a forum for discussing different topics pertaining to sales, marketing, video, and social media. Subscribers to the newsletter and readers of the blog are encouraged to get involved in the discussion by posting their comments here. You can also post your thoughts on Twitter, using the hashtag #PublicParc. Here is this month’s Public Parc discussion:

In your estimation, how much time per day do you usually spend watching online video?

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You Need It, and It’s More Important Than Social Media

Monday, April 5th, 2010
Image representing iPhone 3G as depicted in Cr...
Image via CrunchBase

I hardly listen to the radio anymore. Since purchasing my iPhone about 18 months ago, I spend my time listening to podcasts centered on the specific topics that interest me. A friend and I tried our hands at podcasting several months ago, but the effort quickly fizzled because we really didn’t have much of a strategy before diving into the deep end. However, now that Parc Entertainment is transitioning into Red Fox Media, I am going to give podcasting another go. I am currently working on developing a format and a strategy, so that this venture won’t drift as aimlessly as the last one.

I’m curious to know how many of you currently host a podcast. Why did you start podcasting? What results have you seen from your efforts? What lessons have you learned? One of the shows I listen to is the Internet Marketing Podcast. A recent episode centered on podcasting and featured an interview with Cliff Ravenscraft, one of the web’s leading authorities on podcasting. He offered some great insights on why podcasting is important and how it can be used to build a brand.

What thrills me about the age in which we live is that there are so many resources now available to marketers that can help build an audience. Social media, online video, podcasting, blogging, e-newsletters – in essence these tools have leveled the playing field somewhat, allowing the smallest of businesses to be heard. But one of the main lessons to take away from my brief foray into podcasting thus far is this – regardless of the medium, a successful marketing campaign is based on a solid, pre-produced strategy. You need to know what your goals are going in. You need to know what it is you want to say. Otherwise, the greatest marketing tools will not be able to help you build your brand.

With that in mind, what are some of your favorite marketing tools? What tactics have proven most successful to your business?

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Snack-Sized Video vs. Big Plates Full of Video

Thursday, April 1st, 2010

Experts agree – online video will continue its growth over the next several years as consumption of video content continues to increase. In this video from Beet.TV, Jeff Cole, director of USC’s Center for the Digital Future, predicts that people will soon be spending up to 50 hours per week watching video. This rise (up from only 16 hours in 1975), will be due to the popularity of mobile video. This presents an incredible opportunity for advertisers and marketers, who will be able to use video to reach their audience while consumers are outside the home. This is TV without borders.

The question, however, is on the content itself. Where do you see the trend heading? Do you foresee an audience willing to watch 30 or 60-minute shows on their mobile devices, like Cole predicts? Or, do you you predict that the trend will continue to favor shorter, easily consumable 2-3 minute clips?

In regards to advertisers and marketers, what direction do you see video taking? Will production quality give way to production quantity? In other words, is it more important for advertisers to churn out as much video content as quickly as possible? Or, should they take their time with crafting and creating a well-polished, well-produced marketing video that has a longer shelf life?

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It’s Okay to Make a Bad Video

Thursday, March 25th, 2010
The icon used by Apple to represent Podcasting.
Image via Wikipedia

DishyMix is a podcast in which host Susan Bratton interviews well-known media, internet, and marketing executives. The goal is to provide listeners with insights on how to better market themselves and their brands by taking advantage of the philosophies and tools provided by Susan and her guests.

I was listening to episode 137 recently (follow the link to listen or to read the full transcript) and heard a comment that caught my attention. In the episode, Susan interviews Jim Kukral, a speaker, author, consultant, coach on all things business and marketing. He was on the show to promote his book, Attention, This Book Will Make You Money. Read the following segment of the transcript where Jim talks about the topic of motivation (emphasis added):

Jim Kukral: Motivation; well, you know, I’m kind of a different perspective guy. I know that there’s a lot of people who will tell you to go out and do step by step by step stuff, and I’m a big believer in you just have to go out and try and really fail. You really got to go out and fail. And it’s more important than ever in the internet business, is going out and failing as many times as you possibly can.

Susan Bratton: Yeah, fail and optimize, right?

Jim Kukral: Yeah. I mean there’s so much forgiveness out there right now, you know, in the internet marketing space. YouTube, I’ll give you YouTube for example. I mean YouTube has transformed the way that we are okay with videos now. Before YouTube came along everyone had, you thought you had to have this really nice pre-produced, you know, post production video that was very beautiful. Now it’s kind of like, you look at videos like that you’re kind of like “Ugh.”

Susan Bratton: It’s inauthentic now.

Jim Kukral: It is. And, you know, so it’s okay to make poor quality video now. It’s okay to go out and build a website or a blog or do something that’s not completely perfect, and this economy and everything that we’re, the technology that’s coming out is allowing people to be able to go out there and put stuff out there. So if you want to get motivated you got to go out there and actually just really try it.

In its full context, Jim is advocating that entrepreneurs, inventors, small business owners, etc. not be afraid to step out and take risks; that it’s important to try, even if it doesn’t come out quite right; even if it isn’t perfect. He then goes on to say that it’s acceptable to create a poor quality video in today’s market, because it translates into “authenticity.”

So, I’m going to leave this one open for discussion. I would love to hear your thoughts. Here are some things to consider:

  • Do you agree or disagree with Jim’s assessment?
  • Do you feel that it’s okay for a business to create a poor quality marketing video?
  • When you see a brand with a poor quality video, what is your immediate reaction?
  • Should companies start creating lesser quality videos because it makes them look more authentic?
  • What does this mean long-term for video producers?
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