Posts Tagged ‘promotional video’

Potential Problems For Your Video

Wednesday, October 19th, 2011

Red Fox Media - Video Production - Birmingham, AL - Collection BTS 009You’re set. You’ve hired a video production company to come into your place of business to shoot footage that will eventually be used in an online marketing piece. Everything is good to go. You and the Director have hammered out all the details. You have the talent scheduled. You have the script prepared and memorized. The shot list is ready. All that’s left is to shoot the video.

But have you really thought of everything? Could there be something that you overlooked?

If you work in a location with constant activity (i.e. a retail store, restaurant, salon, etc.), there are two main items on your pre-production checklist that need to be handled before the video production company arrives to set up.

  • Audio – If you plan to record live audio while on set, background noise will be a major concern. You need to take proper steps to ensure that you can capture good, clean audio. Ideally, you will want to shoot the video on a day when your business is not open to the public. This will eliminate sounds like customer chatter, footsteps, doors opening/closing, etc. If you are forced to shoot during a normal business day, try to select non-peak hours in which to shoot. This way, customer traffic should be at a minimum. To help reduce the amount of background noise, try hanging sound blankets around your talent. You can also post a public notice to all customers that filming is in progress and that all chatter should be kept to a whisper. Also look for places within your location that may not have quite as much foot traffic.
  • Release Forms – It’s important to lock down the area directly behind your talent, so that no one wanders into the background of your shot. If that isn’t possible, bear in mind that any customer that wanders into frame will need to give you his/her consent to be in the video. You will need to have release forms ready, in case this happens. If your business has a lot of foot traffic, it may not be feasible to stop every single customer and have each one sign a release form. In that case, you will need to place a public notice at the entrances to your business and around the camera crew which indicates that you are in the process of shooting a video. It will also need to clearly state to your customers that by walking throughout the store, their likeness may be captured on video.



Details are so important when it comes to producing a video for your business. Things that you normally take for granted (i.e. door chimes, customer traffic, electric appliances, chatter) can become distractions when trying to shoot. Talk with your video producer/director about your location and any potential logistical/legal problems you may face. Budget in the time for a tech scout with your video production team. The best way to handle these issues is to take care of them before they become bigger problems.

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Red Fox Media Releases Video for Pelham Senior Center

Friday, September 30th, 2011

Hall Marketing hired us to provide production and post-production services on a video project for the Pelham Senior Center. The video was part of an overall re-branding campaign that included a new logo, new tagline, and new website. The client wanted the video to reflect the new tagline, “It’s a Brand New Day, Everyday” while highlighting the variety of programs, classes, activities, etc. that are offered. We developed a concept for the video that centered on the idea of contrast. The viewer is introduced to an elderly gentleman, writing a letter to his daughter. During the video, the viewer quickly learns that the elderly gentleman (as he describes things to his daughter in the letter) downplays how much fun he’s having. Hall Marketing wrote the script based on our concept. The Pelham Senior Center currently uses the video on their website.

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How to Produce a Video With No Regrets

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011

Coverage is so important when creating a promotional video for your business or non-profit. The word “coverage,” when used in the context of video production, refers to the amount of footage needed to adequately “cover” the scene. So, for example, if you are creating a sales video that describes how your company makes potato chips, you would want the video production company to shoot enough footage to properly communicate what happens at every stage of the process (i.e. Unloading supplies, moving those supplies into the facility, potatoes moving across conveyor belts, potatoes being sliced, etc.).

Neglecting to get adequate coverage during the video shoot means that you cannot properly tell the story when you get everything back to the edit suite. “Well then,” you might ask, “why would anyone neglect to get the coverage they need?”

Most often, in my experience, lack of coverage comes from a lack of time. And a lack of time can be caused by:

-a failure to properly schedule the shoot.

-a failure to stay on schedule due to various circumstances (talent and/or crew arriving late, problems with the location, problems with the gear, multiple takes of a scene that weren’t accounted for, last-second script changes, etc.).

-failure to budget for an adequate amount of crew members.

-failure to invest an amount of money proportional to the size and scope of the project.

The last two points become especially important when creating a promotional video in which the content is documentary in nature. In other words, projects in which everything is dictated by events as they unfold, not by the video producer/director. For some video production projects, you will be able to coordinate all of the action for the camera. You will be able to set up lights, block out the scene, and shoot multiple takes. For other videos, you might only get one chance to shoot the action as it happens.

For the latter situation, you need to make sure that you budget enough to ensure that you have the right amount of crew on location and the right amount of time to shoot everything. Otherwise, you might not get a second chance, and you might find yourself without enough coverage for your video. This is especially true of live events, like trade shows, conferences, seminars, etc. Don’t budget for one camera, when you might need two or three to cover the event. One camera can capture interviews, one camera can capture keynote speakers and breakout sessions, and a third camera can cover the trade show floor. Don’t budget for one-half day, when the conference lasts one or two full days.

The last thing anyone wants (you, your video production crew, your marketing director) is to get into the editing suite only to realize that you have a video full of interviews, but not enough b-roll to flesh out the story. Carefully budget your time and your money and you won’t regret it.

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Red Fox Media Releases Video for Middle Ground

Tuesday, February 1st, 2011

Back in November we were hired by Hall Marketing to produce promotional videos for one of their clients – Hoover City Schools. The school system offers two counseling programs for Middle School and High School students – Middle Ground and Bridges. The client was interested in producing two videos as a way to introduce teachers, students, parents, and other counselors to the programs. We worked with Hall Marketing on the concept for each video and we met with the client to go over our vision for the project. For the Middle Ground video, former University of Alabama running back Bobby Humphrey served as the spokesman. Footage was shot on location at Hoover High School on December 7. Post-production was completed on January 14. The client plans to use each video on the Hoover City Schools website and in live presentations. Below is the final video for the Middle Ground Program. You can watch the Bridges video here.

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Red Fox Media Releases New Video

Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

Back in November we were hired by Hall Marketing to produce a promotional video for one of their clients – Hoover City Schools. The school system offers two counseling programs for Middle School and High School students – Middle Ground and Bridges. The client was interested in producing two videos as a way to introduce teachers, students, parents, and other counselors to the programs. We worked with Hall Marketing on the concept for each video and we met with the client to go over our vision for each video. Footage was shot on location at Hoover High School on December 7. Post-production was completed on January 14. The client plans to use each video on the Hoover City Schools website and in live presentations. Below is the final video for the Bridges Program.

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